Voices of the past.

OMF International is blessed with a rich and inspiring history. For more than 140 years OMF International fieldworkers have labored for God’s glory in East Asia. Originally founded as the China Inland Mission, we have been known as OMF for since 1964. This section contains quotes from some of the early pioneers of OMF International’s past. Read and be encouraged in your faith today.

(Those quotes with an asterisk * – source unknown.)

Hudson Taylor

Taylor, Hudson: about him – His son Howard commented, “He prayed about things as if everything depended upon the praying . . . but he worked also, as if everything depended on his working.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 194.)

Taylor, Hudson: about him – Charles Fishe remarked, “His plan always was, prayer first, talk afterwards.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 119.)

Taylor, Hudson: about him – “Hudson Taylor . . . believed that the C.I.M. must be ‘always advancing.’ Under his leadership, offensives were repeatedly launched just when the situation seemed most hopeless. A church or mission which has lost the initiative and the urge to advance, content merely to consolidate the ground already won, is certain to suffer spiritual loss.” (Leslie T. Lyall. A Passion for the Impossible: The Continuing Story of the Mission Hudson Taylor Began. London: OMF Books, 1965, 98.)

Taylor, Hudson – “A little thing is a little thing, but faithfulness in little things is a great thing.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 154.)

Taylor, Hudson – “After proving God’s faithfulness for many years, I can testify that times of want have ever been times of spiritual blessing, or have led to them.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 406.)

Taylor, Hudson – Brighton, 25 June 1865: “All at once came the thought – If you are simply obeying the LORD, all the responsibility will rest on Him, not on you! What a relief!! Well, I cried to God – You shall be responsible for them, and for me too!” (A.J. Broomhall.Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Three: If I Had a Thousand Lives. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 454.)

Taylor, Hudson – “All God’s giants have been weak men, who did great things for God because they reckoned on His being with them.” (Hudson Taylor’s Choice Sayings: A Compilation from His Writings and Addresses. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 29.)

Taylor, Hudson – “An easy-going non-self-denying life will never be one of power.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 310.)

Taylor, Hudson – “And he who in all things recognises himself as the servant of GOD may count on a sufficiency from GOD for all manner of need, and look with confident expectation to GOD to really prosper him in whatever he does.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Ribband of Blue and Other Bible Studies. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 49.)
Taylor, Hudson – Emily Blatchley reported, “Are we, [Hudson Taylor] asks, prepared to stand firm in the cause we have undertaken at all risks? – thro’ suffering, slander, persecutions, forsakings, to characters blackened and believed to be black, even by those who have hitherto been friends?” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 291.)

Taylor, Hudson – “At home you can never know what it is to be alone – absolutely alone, amidst thousands, as you can in a Chinese city, without one friend, one companion, everyone looking on you with curiosity, with contempt, with suspicion or with dislike. Thus to learn what it is to be despised and rejected of men – of those you wish to benefit, your motives not understood . . . and then to have the love of Jesus applied to your heart by the Holy Spirit . . . this is worth coming for.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Two: Over the Treaty Wall. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 363.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “Believing prayer will lead to whole-hearted action.”

Taylor, Hudson – “But God makes no mistakes; according to their service He divides the help, and those who are called to the holiest service are those who can have least assistance.” (J. Hudson Taylor.Separation and Service: Or Thoughts on Numbers VI, VII. London: Morgan & Scott, n.d., 105.)

Taylor, Hudson – “China is not to be won for Christ by quiet ease-loving men and women.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 57.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Christ is either Lord of all, or is not Lord at all.” (Roger Steer. Hudson Taylor: Lessons in Discipleship. OMF International, 1995, 34.)

Taylor, Hudson: to young Edward Fishe – “Consider six or eight hours a day sacred to the Lord and His work, and let nothing hinder your giving this time (to language study and practice) till you can preach fluently and intelligibly.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 230.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Devotion to GOD is still a voluntary thing; hence the differences of attainment among Christians.” (J. Hudson Taylor.Separation and Service: Or Thoughts on Numbers VI, VII. London: Morgan & Scott, n.d., 13.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “Do not forget the importance of walking according to the light you have, while seeking for more.”

Taylor, Hudson – “For our Master’s sake, may He make us willing to do or suffer all His will.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 78.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “Fruit-bearing involves cross-bearing.”

Taylor, Hudson – “God’s work done in God’s way will never lack God’s supplies.” (Leslie T. Lyall. A Passion for the Impossible: The Continuing Story of the Mission Hudson Taylor Began. London: OMF Books, 1965, 37.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “Has Christ become to us such a living, bright reality that no post of duty shall be irksome, that as His witnesses we can return to the quiet homeside, or to the distant service, with heart more than glad, more than satisfied, even it may be when stripped of earthly friends and treasures?”

*Taylor, Hudson – “He gives the very best to those who leave the choice to him.”

Taylor, Hudson – “He that sanctifieth and those who are sanctified, find their full satisfaction in [Christ], and in Him alone.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Separation and Service: Or Thoughts on Numbers VI, VII. London: Morgan & Scott, n.d., 41-42.)

Taylor, Hudson – “How important, therefore, to learn before leaving England to move man through God by prayer alone.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Retrospect. Philadelphia: China Inland Mission, n.d., 15.)

Taylor, Hudson – “How sadly possible it is to delight in the rest of faith while forgetful to fight the good fight; to dwell upon the cleansing and the purity effected by faith, but to have little thought for the poor souls struggling in the mire of sin.” (Hudson Taylor’s Choice Sayings: A Compilation from His Writings and Addresses. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 71.)

Taylor, Hudson – “I almost wish I had a hundred bodies; they should all be devoted to my Savior in the missionary cause.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Two: Over the Treaty Wall. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 45.)

Taylor, Hudson – In 1881: “I am in great straits for funds. I am happy about it. The Lord may take away all our troublesome people through it and give us true-hearted ones instead.” (A.J. Broomhall.Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 296.)

Taylor, Hudson – “I believe we are all in danger of accumulating – it may be from thoughtlessness, or from pressure of occupation – things which would be useful to others, while not needed by ourselves, and the retention of which entails loss of blessing.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Retrospect. Philadelphia: China Inland Mission, n.d., 14.)

Taylor, Hudson – “I besought Him to give me some work for Him, as an outlet for love and gratitude; some self-denying service, no matter what it might be, however trying or however trivial” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book One: Barbarians at the Gates. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1981, 354.)

Taylor, Hudson – “I could not think that GOD was poor, that He was short of resources, or unwilling to supply any want of whatever work was really His. It seemed to me that if there were lack of funds to carry on work, then to that degree, in that special development, or at that time, it could not be the work of GOD.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Retrospect. Philadelphia: China Inland Mission, n.d., 90.)

Taylor, Hudson – “I have found that there are three stages in every great work of God: first, it is impossible, then it is difficult, then it is done.” (Leslie T. Lyall. A Passion for the Impossible: The Continuing Story of the Mission Hudson Taylor Began. London: OMF Books, 1965, 5.)

Taylor, Hudson – “I have never passed a more anxious or trying month in my life, but I never felt God so present with me.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Two: Over the Treaty Wall. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 192.)

Taylor, Hudson – “I . . . know how much easier it is to lean on an arm of flesh than on the Lord; but I have learned too how much less safe it is.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 346.)
Taylor, Hudson – “I said, ‘You are now placed in a position to help the Chinese as you have never been before. They see that your being a foreigner is now no protection, but increases your danger. Let them see that you are rejoicing in God . . . that you do not need any other protection and that you do not go away, although you might; that you put your trust in God, and are prepared either to suffer or be delivered as He sees best, will learn that there is something in the Gospel worth risking life for.’ What was the result? In almost every place where there were native Christians they grew (in spiritual maturity) as never before.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 257.)
Taylor, Hudson – “I wish sometimes that I had twenty bodies, that at twenty places at once I might publish the saving name of Jesus.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Two: Over the Treaty Wall. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 362.)

Taylor, Hudson – “If God try our faith it is to show His faithfulness, and we shall lose the blessing by appeals etc.” (A.J. Broomhall.Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 407.)

Taylor, Hudson – “If I am guided by God, in going out, He will open the way and provide the means.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Two: Over the Treaty Wall. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 88.)

Taylor, Hudson – “If I had a thousand pounds, China should have it. If I had a thousand lives, China should have them. No! not China, but Christ. Can we do too much for Him?” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Two: Over the Treaty Wall. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 6.)

Taylor, Hudson – “If there was more true abiding in Christ, there would be less selfish abiding at home.” (Hudson Taylor’s Choice Sayings: A Compilation from His Writings and Addresses. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 7.)

Taylor, Hudson – “If this is a real work for God it is a real conflict with Satan.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 189.)

Taylor, Hudson – “If we are faithful to GOD in little things, we shall gain experience and strength that will be helpful to us in the more serious trials of life.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Retrospect. Philadelphia: China Inland Mission, n.d., 20.)

Taylor, Hudson – “If we could offer to the ungodly a worldly plan which would ensure their prospering in all that they undertake, how eagerly they would embrace it! And yet when GOD Himself reveals an effectual plan to His people how few avail themselves of it!.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Ribband of Blue and Other Bible Studies. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 41.)

Taylor, Hudson – “If you want blessing, make room for it.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 309.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “It is in the path of obedience and self-denying service that God reveals Himself most intimately to His children. When it costs most we find the greatest joy. We find the darkest hour the brightest and the greatest loss the highest gain. While the sorrow is short-lived and will soon pass away, the joy is far more exceeding, and it is eternal.”

Taylor, Hudson – “It is not lost time to wait upon God!” (Leslie T. Lyall. A Passion for the Impossible: The Continuing Story of the Mission Hudson Taylor Began. London: OMF Books, 1965, 68.)

Taylor, Hudson – “It needs the presence of special difficulties to manifest to all the workings of God’s mighty power, and for such difficulties we may and should be grateful, and not cast down.” (Hudson Taylor’s Choice Sayings: A Compilation from His Writings and Addresses. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 49.)

Taylor, Hudson – “It was no vain or unintelligent act when, knowing the land, its people and climate, I laid my dear wife and the darling children with myself on the altar for this service.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 363.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Let but faithful labourers be found, who will prove faithful to God, and there is no reason to fear that God will not prove faithful to them.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 58.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Let there be no reservation; give yourselves up fully and wholly to Him whose you are and whom you wish to serve in this work; and then there can be no disappointment.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 358.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Let us give up our work, our thoughts, our plans, ourselves, our lives, our loved ones, our influence, our all, right into His hand, and then, when we have given all over to Him, there will be nothing left for us to be troubled about, or to make trouble about.” (Hudson Taylor’s Choice Sayings: A Compilation from His Writings and Addresses. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 52.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Many there are who fail to see that there can be but one lord, and that those who do not make GOD Lord of all do not make Him Lord at all.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Separation and Service: Or Thoughts on Numbers VI, VII. London: Morgan & Scott, n.d., 47.)

Taylor, Hudson – In 1872, Irish CIMer John McCarthy hoped to have work going in eight prefectures. Hudson Taylor told another, “McCarthy is about to attempt a great work for God, greater than he is aware of.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 375.)

Taylor, Hudson – “My work is a very peculiar [unique] one; in many respects it has, and can have no precedent. It may be called an experiment; to a certain extent it is so. And by God’s help it shall be, as it is being, faithfully made.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 297.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Nearness to GOD calls for tenderness of conscience, thoughtfulness in service, and implicit obedience.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Separation and Service: Or Thoughts on Numbers VI, VII. London: Morgan & Scott, n.d., 26.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Not infrequently our GOD brings His people into difficulties on purpose that they may come to know Him as they could not otherwise do.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Retrospect. Philadelphia: China Inland Mission, n.d., 95.)

Taylor, Hudson – “One difficulty follows another very fast – but God reigns, not chance.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 250.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Our eyes must be upon the Lord, not upon His people. His means – not ours, not theirs, but His means are large; and to a faithful steward He will prove a faithful master.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 382.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Power with God will be the gauge of real power with men.” (Hudson Taylor’s Choice Sayings: A Compilation from His Writings and Addresses. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 49.)

Taylor, Hudson – To CIM’s friends: “Pray for those you send, shield them by prayer.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 294.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Real trust in God cannot be confounded.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 346.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Satan may build a hedge about us and fence us in and hinder our movements, but he cannot roof us in and prevent our looking up.” (Hudson Taylor’s Choice Sayings: A Compilation from His Writings and Addresses. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 13.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Self-denial surely means somethings far greater than some slight and insignificant lessening of our self-indulgences!” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Ribband of Blue and Other Bible Studies. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 113.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Some are jealous of being successors of the Apostles. I would rather be a successor of the Samaritan woman, who, while the Apostles went for meat and forgot souls, forgot her water pot in her zeal to spread the good tidings.” (Hudson Taylor’s Choice Sayings: A Compilation from His Writings and Addresses. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 69.)

Taylor, Hudson – After receiving four letters about serious trouble developing in certain provinces, Taylor began whistling Jesus, I am resting. A missionary with him asked how he could do so. He replied, “Suppose I was to sit down here and burden my heart with all these things; that would not help them, and it would unfit me for the work I have to do. I have just to roll the burden on the Lord.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 107.)

Taylor, Hudson – “The Apostolic plan was not to raise ways and means, but to go and do the work.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 41.)

*Taylor, Hudson – Hudson Taylor was asked what he considered to be the three greatest qualities for a missionary. He replied, “The first is patience, the second is patience, and the third is patience.”

*Taylor, Hudson – “The Great Commission is not an option to be considered, but a command to be obeyed.”

Taylor, Hudson – “The highest service demands the greatest sacrifice, but it secures the fullest blessing and the greatest fruitfulness.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Separation and Service: Or Thoughts on Numbers VI, VII. London: Morgan & Scott, n.d., 15-16.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “The intense activities of our times may lead to zeal in service, to the neglect of personal comunion; but such neglect will not only lessen the value of the service, but tend to incapacitate us for the highest service.”

Taylor, Hudson – “The missionaries should be men of apostolic zeal, patience, endurance, willing to be all things to all men. May the Lord raise up suitable instruments, and fit me for this work.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Two: Over the Treaty Wall. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 23.)

Taylor, Hudson – “The more we rest on this fact, – that we do not know the way we are going, but that we have a GUIDE who does know; that we do not know how to accomplish our service, but that He never leaves us to devise our own service; – the more restful does our life become.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Ribband of Blue and Other Bible Studies. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 102.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “The real secret of an unsatisfied life lies too often in an unsurrendered will.”

Taylor, Hudson – “The sin of neglected communion may be forgiven, and yet the effect remains permanently.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Union and Communion: Or Thoughts on the Song of Solomon. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 17.)

Taylor, Hudson – “The use of means ought not to lessen our faith in GOD; and our faith in GOD ought not to hinder our using whatever means He has given us for the accomplishment of His own purposes.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Retrospect. Philadelphia: China Inland Mission, n.d., 41.)

Taylor, Hudson – “The work . . . is steadily growing and spreading – especially in that most important department, native help. . . . The future hope of China doubtless lies in them. I look on all us foreign missionaries as platform work round a rising building; the sooner it can be dispensed with the better; or rather, the sooner it can be transferred to other places, to serve the same temporary purpose, the better for the work sufficiently forward to dispense with it, and the better for the places yet to be evangelized.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 373.)

Taylor, Hudson – “The work of a true missionary is work indeed, often very monotonous, apparently not very successful, and carried on through great and varied but unceasing difficulties.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 350.)

Taylor, Hudson – “There are three great truths, 1st, That there is a God; 2nd, That He has spoken to us in the Bible; 3rd, That He means what He says. Oh, the joy of trusting Him!” (A.J. Broomhall.Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 322.)

Taylor, Hudson – “There is a living God. He has spoken in the Bible. He means what He says and will do all He has promised.”

Taylor, Hudson – As a satisfied newlywed: “There is great danger of not, in happiness, finding our delight in the Lord.” (A.J. Broomhall.Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Three: If I Had a Thousand Lives. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 131.)

Taylor, Hudson – “To know and to do His will – this is our safety; this is our rest.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Ribband of Blue and Other Bible Studies. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 122.)

Taylor, Hudson – “True devotion will rather ask to be allowed to give, and will count as loss all which may not be given up for the Lord’s sake.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Union and Communion: Or Thoughts on the Song of Solomon. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 68.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “Unless there is an element of risk in our exploits for God, there is no need for faith.”

Taylor, Hudson – “Wave after wave of trial rolled over us; but at the end of the year some of us were constrained to confess, that we had learned more of the loving-kindness of the Lord than in any previous year of our lives.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 285.)

Taylor, Hudson – “We are taking our four little children, and I never need anyone to remind me that they need their breakfast . . . dinner . . . supper. And I cannot imagine that our heavenly Father is less able or less willing to remember His children’s needs, when He sends them forth to the end of the earth about His business.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 156.)

Taylor, Hudson – “We believe that the time has come for doing more fully what He has commanded us; and by His grace we intend to do it. Not to try, for we see no Scriptural authority for trying. Try is a word constantly in the mouth of unbelievers, . . . far too often taken up by believers. In our experience, ‘to try’ has usually meant ‘to fail’. (The Lord’s) command is not ‘Do your best,’ but ‘DO IT’.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 47.)

Taylor, Hudson – “We have so often been disappointed that we must not be too sure of anything, save of God’s help and presence which He will never withhold.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 78.)

*Taylor, Hudson – On September 13, 1888, Jonathan Goforth, famed Canadian pioneer Presbyterian missionary to China, made his first exploration tour of North Honan. Honan was considered one of the most anti-foreign and dangerous parts of China. Yet God had called Goforth to it. Hudson Taylor wrote him, “We have been trying, unsuccessfully, for ten years, to get into Honan. We’ve been beaten, stoned, and turned back time and again. Brother, if you would enter that province, you must go forward on your knees!” (from Bill Fietje letter)

*Taylor, Hudson – “We may be sure that days of adversity, as well as days of prosperity, are full of blessing. The believer does not need to wait until he sees the reason of God’s afflictive dealings with him ere he is satisfied; he knows that all things work together for good to them that love God.”

Taylor, Hudson – “We may fail, do fail continually, but He never fails.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 175.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “We must triumph with God, and then we shall succeed with men, and be made blessings to them.”

Taylor, Hudson – “We shall find that Separation to GOD is followed by Blessing from GOD; and that those who receive large blessing from Him, in turn render to Him acceptable Service; service in which GOD takes delight, and which He places in everlasting remembrance.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Separation and Service: Or Thoughts on Numbers VI, VII. London: Morgan & Scott, n.d., 10.)

Taylor, Hudson – “We wish to see churches and Christian Chinese presided over by pastors and officers of their own countrymen, worshipping the true God in the land of their fathers, in the costume of their fathers, in their own tongue wherein they were born, and in edifices of a thoroughly Chinese style of architecture.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 356.)

Taylor, Hudson – “What I have to watch against is impatience at waiting His time.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 408.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “When His providential dispensations seem most dark and cloudy, or most contrary to our thoughts and out desires, there can be no questions as to who is right. It is our thoughts and desires which must have been wrong.”

Taylor, Hudson – “When the heart submits, then Jesus reigns When Jesus reigns, there is rest.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Union and Communion: Or Thoughts on the Song of Solomon. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 13.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “When you can serve the King of kings, why stoop to serve the king of England?”

*Taylor, Hudson – “When you need it, rest in body; rest always in spirit.” J. Hudson Taylor. Dwelling in Him. Worthing: Overseas Missionary Fellowship.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Where the need is greatest let us be found gladly obeying the MASTER’S command. For it is in the harvest-field, it is among the reapers, that we shall find Him.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Ribband of Blue and Other Bible Studies. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 94.)

Taylor, Hudson – “While unbelief sees the difficulties, faith sees God between itself and them.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Two: Over the Treaty Wall. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 62.)

Taylor, Hudson – “With GOD all things are possible, and no conviction ever takes place save by the almighty power of the HOLY GHOST. The great need, therefore, of every Christian worker is to know GOD.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Retrospect. Philadelphia: China Inland Mission, n.d., 35.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Work is the outcome of effort; fruit, of life.” (J. Hudson Taylor. A Ribband of Blue and Other Bible Studies. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 45.)

Taylor, Hudson – “You are not sent to preach death and sin and judgment, but life and holiness and salvation – not to be a witness against the people, but to be a witness for God – to preach the good news – Christ Himself.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 258.)

*Taylor, Hudson – “You can work without praying, but it is a bad plan; but you cannot pray in earnest without working. Do not be so busy with work for Christ that you have no strength left for praying. True prayer requires strength.”

Taylor, Hudson – “You do not need a great faith, but faith in a great God.” (Roger Steer. Hudson Taylor: Lessons in Discipleship. OMF International, 1995, 51.)

Taylor, Hudson – “The vine . . . is not the root merely, but all – root, stem, branches, twigs, leaves, flowers, fruit: and Jesus is not only that: He is soil and sunshine, air and showers, and ten thousand times more than we ever dreamed, wished for, or needed.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Dwelling in Him. Robesonia: Overseas Missionary Fellowship.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Fruit-bearing involves cross-bearing. We know how the Lord Jesus became fruitful – not by bearing His Cross merely, but by dying on it. Do we know much of fellowship with Him in this? ” (J. Hudson Taylor. Fruit Bearing. Philadelphia: Overseas Missionary Fellowship.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Let us give up our work, our thoughts, our plans, ourselves, our lives, our loved ones, our influence, our all, right into His hand, and then, when we have given all over to Him, there will be nothing left for us to trouble about, or to make trouble about.” (J. Hudson Taylor. Great Is Thy Faithfulness. Philadelphia: Overseas Missionary Fellowship.)

Taylor, Hudson – “I so want you to realise this principle of working with God and asking Him for everything. If the work is at the command of God, then we can go to Him in full confidence for workers; and when God gives the workers, we can go to Him for means to supply their needs.” (J. Hudson Taylor. God’s Fellow Workers. Philadelphia: Overseas Missionary Fellowship.)

Taylor, Hudson – “Argument almost always leaves behind a sore feeling in the heart of the one who has been worsted. By loving teaching, by Christ-like living, we are to win this people for our Lord. They do not understand what disinterested love and unselfishness mean: you are to go and live it amont them.” (J. Hudson Taylor.God’s Fellow Workers. Philadelphia: Overseas Missionary Fellowship.)

J.O. Fraser

Fraser, J.O. – “I am feeling more and more that it is, after all, just the prayers of God’s people that call down blessing upon the work, whether they are directly engaged in it or not. Paul may plant and Apollos water, but it is God who gives the increase; and this increase can be brought down from heaven by believing prayer, whether offered in China or in England. . . . If this is so, then Christians at home can do as much for foreign missions as those actually on the field. . . . What I covet more than anything else is earnest, believing prayer.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 52.)

Fraser, J.O. – “Solid, lasting missionary work is done on our knees.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 52.)

Fraser, J.O. – On 4 January 1916, before revival broke out among the Lisu, Fraser wrote in his journal, “I do not intend to be one of those who bemoan little results, while resting in the faithfulness of God. My cue is to take hold of the faithfulness of God and USE THE MEANS necessary to secure big results.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 151.)

Fraser, J.O. – On 16 January 1916, not one Lisu attended the worship service. Fraser wrote, “Here then we see God’s way of success in our work, whatever it may be – a trinity of prayer, faith and patience.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 151.)

Fraser, J.O. – On 5 February 1916, Fraser wrote, “I’m now setting my face like a flint: if the work seems to fail, then pray; if services, and the like, fall flat, then pray still more; if months slip by with little or no result, then pray still more and get others to help you.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 154.)

Fraser, J.O. – On 20 March 1916, Fraser wrote, “The aim of Satanic power is to cut off communication with God. To accomplish this aim he deludes the soul with a sense of defeat, covers him with a thick cloud of darkness, depresses and oppresses the spirit, which in turn hinders prayer and leads to unbelief – thus destroying all power.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 157.)

Fraser, J.O. – On 20 March 1916, Fraser wrote, “The enemy is delighted to have us so occupied incessantly with secondary and trivial concerns, as to keep us from attacking and resisting in the true spirit of the conflict.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 157.)

Fraser, J.O. – After 200 Lisu families came to faith, Fraser turned to a ministry of grounding them. This new emphasis taught him new lessons. “My mistake has too often been that of too much haste. But it is not the people’s way to hurry, nor is it God’s way either. Hurry means worry, and worry effectually drives the peace of God from the heart.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 189.)

Fraser, J.O. – Fraser encouraged his prayer partners to press on. “It is necessary for me to go around [to the Lisu villages] preaching, teaching, exhorting, rebuking; but the amount of progress made depends almost entirely on the state of the spiritual tide in the village – a condition which you can control upon your knees as well as I.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 203.)

Fraser, J.O. – Fraser knew the important part that prayer partners play. “I really believe that if every particle of prayer put up by the home churches on behalf of the infant churches of the mission field were removed, the latter would be swamped by an incoming flood of the powers of darkness.” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 223.)

Fraser, J.O. – Fraser urged his prayer partners to assume a greater role. “I am not asking you just to give ‘help’ in prayer as a sort of sideline, but I am trying to roll the main responsibility of this prayer-warfare on you. I want you to take the BURDEN of these people upon your shoulders. I want you to wrestle with God for them” (Geraldine Taylor. Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 225.)

Fraser, J.O. – In 1922, Fraser wrote his prayer partners, “I used to think that prayer should have the first place and teaching the second. I now feel that it would be truer to give prayer the first, second and third place, and teaching the fourth.” (Geraldine Taylor.Behind the Ranges: The Life-changing Story of J.O. Fraser. Singapore: OMF International (IHQ) Ltd., 1998, 269.)

J. Oswald Sanders

Sanders, J. Oswald – “Each of us is as full of the Spirit as we really want to be.” (J. Oswald Sanders. Spiritual Leadership. Chicago: Moody Press, 1967, 118.)

*Sanders, J. Oswald – “Peace is not the absence of trouble, but the presence of God.”

Sanders, J. Oswald – “There is no such thing as clearness of vision where there is not cleanness of heart.” (J. Oswald Sanders. Spiritual Maturity. Chicago: Moody Press, 1962, 103-04.)

Sanders, J. Oswald – “Three handicaps to effectual prayer which only the Spirit can help overcome: iniquity of the heart; ignorance of the mind; and infirmity of the body.” (J. Oswald Sanders. Spiritual Leadership. Chicago: Moody Press, 1967, 128.)

Sanders, J. Oswald – “We must get away from the idea that deliverance from trial is the highest form of spiritual blessing. . . . We learn more in a few days in the fiery furnace than we would learn in years out of it.” (J. Oswald Sanders. Spiritual Maturity. Chicago: Moody Press, 1962, 64.)

C.T. Studd

Studd, C.T. – “A lost reputation is the best degree for Christ’s service.”

Studd, C.T. – In 1884, C.T. Studd, one of the Cambridge Seven, felt convicted, “How could I spend the best hours of my life in working for myself and for the honor and pleasures of this world while thousands and thousands of souls are perishing every day without having heard of the Lord Jesus Christ, going down to Christless and hopeless graves?” (John Pollock. The Cambridge Seven, 2nd ed. Great Britain: Marshalls, 1985, 75.)

*Studd, C.T. – “If Jesus Christ be the Son of God and died for me, then no sacrifice can be too great for me to make for Him.”

Studd, C.T. – In 1885, C.T. Studd, one of the Cambridge Seven, ended his remarks at their farewell meeting, “What I would have you gather is that God does not deal with you until you are wholly given up to Him, and then He will tell you what He would have you do.” (John Pollock. The Cambridge Seven, 2nd ed. Great Britain: Marshalls, 1985, 109.)

More Quotes

Blatchley, Emily – After the Lammermuir party survived two typhoons: “The feeling of our hearts when the storm subsided was that we had been brought back from the verge of the grave that we might devote ourselves afresh to God. . . . May we live as those who are alive from the dead.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 212.)

Borden, William: about him – William Borden, member of the wealthy milk family, gave up a life of ease to serve Muslims in China. At age 26, however, he died in Egypt while preparing for that great work. Professor Charles Erdman of Princeton Seminary remarked, “Apart from Christ, there is no explanation of such a life.” (Mrs. Howard Taylor. Borden of Yale ’09: “The Life that Counts.”Philadelphia: China Inland Mission, 1926, 275.)

Borden, William – William Borden went on a round-the-world trip after high school. The idol worshippers he saw in Asia burdened him. He decided to join the China Inland Mission. One friend expressed surprise that he was “throwing himself away as a missionary.” Borden replied, “You have not seen heathenism.” (Mrs. Howard Taylor.Borden of Yale ’09: “The Life that Counts.” Philadelphia: China Inland Mission, 1926, 211.)

Broumton, James – “Most travellers in Yunnan carry arms, we had none; but we had the arm of God.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 253.)

Chinese Christian schoolgirl – At her death: “You must not weep. I have seen the Lord! I have seen heaven. It is very, very good. . . . I wish you come – there is nothing to fear.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 295.)

Christ Is All (the book that helped John McCarthy and Hudson Taylor spiritually) – “The Saviour welcomed, is all Holiness begun. The Saviour cherished is all Holiness advancing. The Saviour never absent, is Holiness complete.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 212.)

Dorward, Adam – “There is nothing I would like so much as a heart wholly occupied with God – a pure, holy, consecrated heart.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 279.)

Elliston, W. L. – “No one knows what it is to face a heathen city, with no friends near, until they try it. One lesson that comes to me to-day is the absolute importance of utter consecration of all to Jesus, if we would have His power upon us. Can you and I leave all with Him – life, death, health, comfort, dear ones? May God help us! Missionary life, according to God’s idea, is wonderfully happy. Compromise means weakness and clouds.” (China’s Millions, 1888 edition. Edited by J. Hudson Taylor. London: Morgan and Scott, 1888, 58.)

Faulding, Jennie – “How I wish that burning soul-stirring words could be written, words that would induce wrestling prayer and earnest effort. . . . How few are those who live for souls as worldly men live for riches, from year end to year end, first thing in the morning, last thing at night, every obstacle made to give way by persevering effort. . . . People speak of the progress of truth being slow, and in the half-truth hide the Church’s guilt.” (A.J. Broomhall.Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact.London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 335.)

Faulding, Jennie – “It may be that as a Mission we are to be baptized with His baptism and so made more fruitful. His will be done.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 209.)

Faulding, Jennie – “What may be in the future, we cannot tell; trials there are sure to be, perhaps dangers and sorrows and hardships which as yet we have not dreamed of, but God is with us and He will keep our hearts in perfect peace.” (A.J. Broomhall.Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 82.)

Frost, Henry – One conclusion from Bible studies on the filling of the Holy Spirit, as led by Henry Frost: “That the result of a filling is not that we should have more of God but that He should have more of us.” (Dr. and Mrs. Howard Taylor. By Faith. Singapore: Overseas Missionary Fellowship (IHQ) Ltd., 1988, 207.)

Gregg, Jessie – Jessie Gregg served as a single woman from 1895 to 1937. Before becoming an effective evangelist among Chinese women, she found that “a great burden for souls was laid upon my heart, and I cried, ‘Give me children or I die.’” (Phyllis Thompson.Each To Her Post: Six Women of the China Inland Mission. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 97.)

Hamer, Lilian – Lilian Hamer served among the Chinese and then the Lisu in Thailand from 1944 to 1959. One of her last letters reported her discovery, “God has been speaking to me recently about the love needed to do His work. Love for Him and others must by the supreme motive. . . . Climbing a mountain is for love of Him, lack of privacy, lack of comforts, lack of fellowship, loneliness and all that is involved in working among a mountain tribe when done for love of Him becomes a precious opportunity to show how much we love Him.” (Phyllis Thompson. Each To Her Post: Six Women of the China Inland Mission. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 132.)

Hogben, Rowland – “Prayer is the interruption of human ambition.” (Carolyn Armitage. Reaching for the Goal: The Life Story of David Adeney. Wheaton, IL: OMF IHQ, Ltd., 1993, 42.)

Hunter, George: about him – George Hunter pioneered work in far northwest China. In 1914, a Chinese man reported about him, “Seven or eight years ago, a foreigner passed through our village . . . and gave me a book, saying, ‘Old gentleman, I want to give you this book. Take it home and read it. It contains the true doctrine!’ . . . I took the book home, and as I read its pages, I destroyed my idols, I tore my household gods off the door and burned them, and I severed my connections with the three secret societies to which I belonged. Since then, I have worshipped the God of that book.” (Mildred Cable and Francesca French. George Hunter: Apostle of Turkestan. London: China Inland Mission, 1948, 87.)

Lammermuir Party: John Stevenson remarked, “I felt that the mission must succeed with such an amount of real waiting upon God.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 266.)

Mather, Percy: about him – Percy Mather served in far northwest China from 1910 to 1933. In 1926, he took his one and only furlough. Was he itching to get back to the romance and adventure of his ministry? No. “His close friends realised that he returned to Central Asia with a great burden on his heart, unrelieved by any exhilaration.” (Mildred Cable and Francesca French. The Making of a Pioneer: Percy Mather of Central Asia. New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1935, 219.)

Mather, Percy – Percy Mather served in far northwest China from 1910 to 1933. He explained, “I must be where the need is greatest and the work hardest.” (Mildred Cable and Francesca French. The Making of a Pioneer: Percy Mather of Central Asia. New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1935, 88.)

Mather, Percy – Thinking back on a near disastrous journey in far northwest China in 1929, Percy Mather marvelled, “The long delay brought us into close touch with [Mongolians] and [Kazakhs] and gave us opportunities for preaching the Gospel to many who have never heard it before, and may never hear it again.” (Mildred Cable and Francesca French. The Making of a Pioneer: Percy Mather of Central Asia. New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1935, 239.)

Mathews, Arthur – “The one who will stay with his assignment through thick and thin is the one who . . . is more concerned to guard his daily dying than his living rights.” (R. Arthur Mathews. Born for Battle. Robesonia, PA: OMF Books, 1978, 112.)

McCarthy, John – In August 1869, John McCarthy wrote Hudson Taylor, “How then to have our faith increased? Only by thinking of all that Jesus is – all He is for us. . . . Not a striving to have faith or to increase our faith. But a looking at the faithful One, seems all we need, a resting in the loved One.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 213.)

McDonald, Dr. Jessie – In 1941, Dr. Jessie McDonald was travelling to southwest China via Myanmar. An experience in Rangoon caused her to write, “I went to the [Scottish Church] this evening, in a beautiful, wealthy, comfortable church with a splendid choir, just like a lovely home church. We came back past the big pagoda, twinkling in the moonlight – and past hundreds of yellow-robed Buddhist priests, and my heart felt heavy. It must be very discouraging for the Lord. He must think that we might have done better.” (Phyllis Thompson. Each To Her Post: Six Women of the China Inland Mission. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship. 1982, 102.)

McDonald, Dr. Jessie – Dr. Jessie McDonald began serving in China in 1913. The Japanese military forced her from her first assignment. Though World War II failed to force her from her second assignment, the Communists eventually succeeded, in 1951. She had learned the lesson, “It does not do to run away from duty – the only safe place is where God would put us.” (Phyllis Thompson.Each To Her Post: Six Women of the China Inland Mission. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 126.)

Meadows, James – During a time of rebel occupation and expulsion: “I have just got up from my knees. I have been weeping at the feet of Jesus because I cannot learn the dialect quick enough. Tens of thousands of souls are perishing all around me, and I cannot tell them about the Saviour.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Three: If I Had a Thousand Lives. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1982, 297.)

Murray, Jessie – On the death of a Christian girl who died in her school: “It is not death to die. How glorious!” (A.J. Broomhall.Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 295.)

Parker, F.S. – Regarding the departure of his daughter Susie, an only child, among the first CIM North American party, Mr. Parker stated, “I have nothing too precious for my Lord Jesus.” (Dr. and Mrs. Howard Taylor. By Faith. Singapore: Overseas Missionary Fellowship (IHQ) Ltd., 1988, 125.)

Parker, F.S. – After learning that his daughter Susie, an only child, had died of malignant fever, Mr. Parker stated, “I can still say, ‘I have nothing too precious for my Lord Jesus.’” (Dr. and Mrs. Howard Taylor. By Faith. Singapore: Overseas Missionary Fellowship (IHQ) Ltd., 1988, 125.)

Radstock, Lord – “I believe that our great failure in England arises from what I should call a comfortable religion . . . that there are more Christians that are injured by comfort than by anything else. Comfort seems to paralyse work on all sides.” (A.J. Broomhall.Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Six: Assault on the Nine. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1988, 304.)

Rudland, William – “I could put up with anything, could I but tell (the Chinese) of a Saviour’s love.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 222.)

Schofield, Dr. Harold – “What we owe to Him we shall never fully realize in this world; but, personally, I have found that by living in the midst of this vast heathen land [China], one gradually realizes it more and more.” (China’s Millions, 1883 edition. Edited by J. Hudson Taylor. London: Morgan and Scott, 1883, 131.)

Searell, Edith – In one of her last letters before dying in the Boxer Rebellion, she responded, “You speak in your letter of the possibility of one place being safer than another; I think, dear Eva, from the human standpoint all are equally unsafe, from the point of view of those whose lives are hid with Christ in God all are equally safe! . . . ‘A mighty fortress is our God,’ and in Him we are safe for time and eternity. Shall we murmur if we have less of time than we expected?” (Martyred Missionaries of the China Inland Mission with a Record of the Perils and Sufferings of Some Who Escaped. Edited by Marshall Broomhall. Toronto: China Inland Mission, 1901.)

Smith, Stanley – Around 1880, Stanley Smith, later to be one of the Cambridge Seven, wrote in his diary, “O Lord, save souls and lay upon me the burden of souls, at least twenty-five thousand.” (John Pollock. The Cambridge Seven, 2nd ed. Great Britain: Marshalls, 1985, 21.)

Smith, Stanley – In 1883, Stanley Smith, later to be one of the Cambridge Seven, resolved that “God helping me, I will never miss another opportunity of speaking definitely to a man about his soul when he is alone with me.” (John Pollock. The Cambridge Seven, 2nd ed. Great Britain: Marshalls, 1985, 61.)

Solomon, Dr. Robert – “The more we understand our destiny, the less we worry about our baggage.” (from message given at Orientation Course at IHQ in January 1989.)

Stam, Betty – Having discovered the exchanged life as a college student in 1924, Betty Stam (still Betty Scott then) explained, “When we consecrate ourselves to God, we think we are making a great sacrifice, and doing lots for Him, when really we are only letting go some little, bitsie trinkets we have been grabbing, and when our hands are empty, He fills them full of His treasures.” (Mrs. Howard Taylor. The Triumph of John and Betty Stam. Philadelphia: China Inland Missions, 1935, 35.)

Stam, John – Giving the class address at his graduation from Moody Bible Institute in 1932, John Stam challenged the audience, “We have been guilty of acting more like the beleagured garrison of a doomed fortress than like soldiers of our ever-conquering Christ.” (Mrs. Howard Taylor. The Triumph of John and Betty Stam. Philadelphia: China Inland Missions, 1935, 35.)
Stevenson, John: about him – Ning, a scholarly Chinese gentleman, remarked, “Here is a foreigner, a perfect stranger to me, yet so concerned about my welfare that he will pray for me though I do not so much as pray for myself.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 344.)

Stott, George – One of his legs was amputated. While recovering, he came to faith. A teacher, he read about China. “I do not see those with two legs going, so I must.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Four: Survivors’ Pact. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1984, 63.)

Taylor, James (Hudson’s father) – “He cannot deny Himself, He would not be God if He could.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book One: Barbarians at the Gates. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1981, 287.)

Taylor, Maria – “As to the harsh judgings of the world, or the more painful misunderstandings of Christian brethren, I generally feel that the best plan is to go on with our work and leave God to vindicate our cause.” (A.J. Broomhall. Hudson Taylor and China’s Open Century, Book Five: Refiner’s Fire. London: Hodder and Stoughton and Overseas Missionary Fellowship, 1985, 177.)