OMF Content Feed

7 May 2019

Ramadan on my Road

“What’s Ramadan like in my area? Well, during working hours in Ramadan the city streets are much quieter than usual with people trying to conserve energy by staying in their air-conditioned shops and offices.

This all changes in the mid-afternoon, as everyone joins the rush home, often stopping at a Ramadan market on the way to pick up food delicacies including curries, savoury snacks and sweet deserts. The streets then empty again as people wait in front of their food at home or in restaurants for the evening call to prayer at around 7:15pm, which signals the time for them to break the fast. This is almost the only opportunity to meet people socially during Ramadan. However, there isn’t much time to linger over the meal, as people rush off to pray. They need to do this before the last call to prayer at about 8:30pm.

The streets around the mosques and prayer halls are then filled with people flocking to the special night time prayers which are believed to bring additional merit during Ramadan. And so, many women, who don’t usually go to the mosque to pray, and children join the men in attending the prayers. The best thing we can do for Muslims during Ramadan is to increase our prayers for them.”

From a Christian professional in Southeast Asia

Will you pray for East Asia’s Muslims?

  • Pray for God to bless Muslims’ relationships as they spend time together each evening when they break the fast.
  • Local followers of Jesus with good relationships with the community are often invited to the breaking of the fast each day. Pray for good conversations in these times.
  • Pray for workers and employers to be patient with one another during Ramadan, when people are more tired and hungry.

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