OMF Content Feed

11 September 2018

Café Iris

There is a little café beside our local church. It’s a comfortable space with colourfully painted walls. People feel welcome here. Most Japanese have never been into church before, so this little café is a gate into the church, a chance to meet Jesus.

 

One lady often comes to the Café Iris when she feels fearful. When she came recently, a member of staff listened to her story, comforted and encouraged her, and invited her to come to the church on Sundays.

Two junior high school girls also turned up. They heard the gospel from their English teacher who works part-time at the café. We arranged to meet these girls together over a cup of tea and talk more about Jesus together.

 

Jesus said, “Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it. But small is the gate and narrow the road that leads to life, and only a few find it” (Matt 7:13-14 NIV).

 

The church’s door is often a very “narrow gate” for Japanese people. But Café Iris makes it a little bit wider and can help people onto the narrow road of Jesus who leads to eternal life.

By Emily, an OMF missionary in Japan

Will you pray for Japan?

  • Pray for the work of Café Iris and other similar church projects to help connect people to church, including this lady and the two high school girls.
  • May God have mercy and bring more Japanese to enter through the ‘narrow door that leads to life’.
  • Pray that God would show you how you can use gifts you have for His mission to the world, whether that’s a love of books, coffee, business or anything else.

Pray

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Learn more about OMF Japan.

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